The Orchestra Pit The Orchestra Pit

New Release - Naïm Amor 7" Gatefold EP

Naïm’s second release for The Orchestra Pit Recording Co. comes in a gorgeous gatefold sleeve and once again features recordings from his 2 albums made with Calexico’s Joey Burns & John Convertino and PJ Harvey cohort John Parish (‘Sanguine’ and ‘Mistake Love’ respectively).

Disc one features the lead track “Precious Second”, a reflective autumnal shuffle, combining Naïm’s gallic suave with that bone dry Tucson backbeat to create an elegantly simple 3 minute pop song; whilst flip-side “Woman, Who’s A Woman”, with lyrics penned by Marianne Dissard, is a languid rocker à la Velvet Underground, replete with a great Keith Moon style drum break from former Calexico member Tasha Bundy. The bonus disc offers up one of the highlights from Naïm’s series of ‘Soundtracks’ albums, now on it’s third volume, the track “Stuck (instr.)” originally featured on Volume II which was put out through Howe Gelb’s OwOm label; and finally we have Naïm’s take on the Kermit classic “(it's not easy) Bein’ Green”, ubiquitous though it may well be of late, Naïm takes the song back to it’s roots.....as he says “I’m French…don’t worry”.

Hear excerpts of the four tracks go here: http://www.theorchestrapit.com/op8

View the Precious Second video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YTjkTXuSTjE

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"Somewhere in the year of 2006 Naim Amor and I spent some time in Tucson playing acoustic guitars, talking about songs, searching for old vintage guitars to refurbish and thinking of making a record at home with the idea to make a "late night and laid back" feeling album. I loved the whole way in which we constructed the tracks, each with an acoustic guitar and adding a few overdubs or John Convertino's lush brush work on the drums. We were aiming at making sparse arrangements that gave a sense of depth and atmosphere to Naim's hushed vocals."

"The song "Precious Second" stands out as one of the strongest tracks both melodically and lyrically. The song builds on the interweaving acoustic guitars, and the backbeat shuffle of the brushes, but it is Naim's vocals together with the jazz/folk harmonic shifts in the bridge which paint the mood and emotional twist of time and place. I love how the second half of the song transitions out of the melodic guitar solo and into the final chorus. You hear Naim's vocals become consumed in a sea of reverb as the song continues to unfold. These subtleties in phrasing and vocal emphasis is what pulls you in and makes you want to untangle the simple lines that are woven so well."

Joey Burns (Calexico), August 2009
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